Real world proof that Covid jabs DO work: Vaccine rollout sees 97% fall in deaths among the over-70s

COVID deaths among the over-70s have plunged by 97 per cent in ten weeks thanks to the vaccine rollout.

In the past week there has been an average of just 32 daily deaths in the over-70s. At the peak of the crisis in mid-January, deaths among this age group had topped 1,000 a day in England.

In the week of January 15, there were an average of 698 daily deaths in the over-80s and 266 a day among people in their 70s.

COVID deaths among the over-70s have plunged by 97 per cent in ten weeks thanks to the vaccine rollout. Picture: Stock

COVID deaths among the over-70s have plunged by 97 per cent in ten weeks thanks to the vaccine rollout. Picture: Stock

COVID deaths among the over-70s have plunged by 97 per cent in ten weeks thanks to the vaccine rollout. Picture: Stock

Yet last Thursday – the most recent day with complete data – only seven people in their 70s and 15 over-80s died from Covid.

Yesterday another 56 deaths and 4,040 cases were recorded around the UK.

Nine in ten pensioners, and 54 per cent of the entire population, now have antibodies to fight off Covid.

Analysis of death rates show they have fallen most rapidly among groups which have been vaccinated. 

Less than half of all deaths are now in the over-80s, compared to nearly two-thirds before the vaccine was rolled out.

Data covering the week up to March 19 shows that deaths fell by 44 per cent among those in their 50s. 

This compares to a 28 per cent drop among those under-50, most of whom are still waiting for their jabs.

Critics of lockdown have questioned why restrictions are still necessary when deaths, cases and hospitalizations are at their lowest for six months. 

Christopher Snowdon, from the Institute of Economic Affairs, said: ‘The Government was right to take a cautious approach at first, but the schools have reopened without any surge in infections and the vaccination programme has exceeded all expectations.

‘With 90 per cent of pensioners having antibodies, there is a strong case for fully reopening the hospitality sector on April 12. 

‘Waiting until May 17 would give us five weeks of additional financial pain for little gain. Sticking stubborn to an outdated roadmap would be an act of futile self-harm..’

Steve Baker, who leads the Tory Covid Recovery Group of MPs, said: ‘Once again the data shows the Government is succeeding beyond all of our expectations.

‘The Prime Minister should now have the models updated to see whether he can bring forward his “no earlier than” dates. That is the only way to really maintain public confidence that we are getting our freedom as soon as possible.’ 

Critics of lockdown have questioned why restrictions are still necessary when deaths, cases and hospitalizations are at their lowest for six months. Pictured: Vaccinations are administered inside Salisbury Cathedral

Critics of lockdown have questioned why restrictions are still necessary when deaths, cases and hospitalizations are at their lowest for six months. Pictured: Vaccinations are administered inside Salisbury Cathedral

Critics of lockdown have questioned why restrictions are still necessary when deaths, cases and hospitalizations are at their lowest for six months. Pictured: Vaccinations are administered inside Salisbury Cathedral

Hotelier Sir Rocco Forte said: ‘Of course it’s reasonable to accelerate the roadmap out of lockdown.

‘What is the point of vaccinating people if we’re going to carry on just as before. All the vulnerable have had one jab, most people over-50 have had one jab.

‘It’s complete overkill. If you cut off a business’s income, it is going to go bankrupt.’

Hugh Osmond, founder of Punch Taverns, who is part of a legal challenge against the Government’s roadmap, said: ‘We’re down at case levels that the roadmap say we would not reach until mid-April – so we are two or three weeks ahead of where we should be. It’s inexplicable that they would not bring it forward if they are going to stick to their promise of data, not dates.’

William Lees-Jones, owner of JW Lees, which runs 42 pubs and hotels, said: ‘If I were prime minister I would say we can open two weeks after non-essential retail, because the data says we can do that. 

‘An April 26 reopening gives the trade an extra three weeks of prime summer trading. Just think of all the money the Treasury are spending in furlough on people who could be working.

‘I can see no reason why we can’t aim to open sooner.’

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