More than 40% of US adults have had at least one dose of Covid vaccine 

More than 40 percent of American adults have now had at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine, the White House Covid response team announced on Monday. 

Nearly one in four adults are now fully vaccinated, as are 55 percent of seniors in the U.S., revealed response team member Andy Slavitt during a press briefing. 

The U.S. is now giving an average of more than three million shots a day, and more than four million doses were administered on Saturday – a record number of vaccinations.  

That’s more than five-times faster than the global rate, according to a CNN analysis.  

At this rate the U.S. is on track to reach herd immunity, with 75 percent of the population vaccinated by July, according to Bloomberg tracking.  

More than 40 percent of U.S. adults - nearly one in three Americans - have now had at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine, with a record four million shots given on Saturday

More than 40 percent of U.S. adults - nearly one in three Americans - have now had at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine, with a record four million shots given on Saturday

More than 40 percent of U.S. adults – nearly one in three Americans – have now had at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine, with a record four million shots given on Saturday 

White House Covid response adviser Andy Slavitt announced that the majority of seniors are now fully vaccinated and said the U.S. is moving 'in the right direction' but 'the war against COVID-19 is not won' (file)

White House Covid response adviser Andy Slavitt announced that the majority of seniors are now fully vaccinated and said the U.S. is moving 'in the right direction' but 'the war against COVID-19 is not won' (file)

White House Covid response adviser Andy Slavitt announced that the majority of seniors are now fully vaccinated and said the U.S. is moving ‘in the right direction’ but ‘the war against COVID-19 is not won’ (file) 

With one shot given to more than 40 percent of U.S. adults, about one in three Americans (including children) has now had at least their first dose of coronavirus vaccines. 

The rollout is now accelerating rapidly, and herd immunity will soon be reached among America’s most vulnerable population: the elderly, Slavitt said.  

More than 55 percent of seniors aged 65 or older are now fully vaccinated. 

And more three quarters of seniors have had at least a first dose, meaning that within a month, 75 percent of older Americans will be fully vaccinated against COVID-19. 

U.S. clinics are now giving more than 3.1 million shots a day, on average – up from an average of 2.7 million the week prior.   

Federal mass vaccination sites have given about two million shots to-date, Slavitt said. 

Encouragingly, more than 60 percent of doses administered at these FEMA sites went to racial and ethnic minorities, Slavitt said.  

People of color in the U.S. have been hit particularly hard by COVID-19, with black and Latinx people facing twice the risk of dying from coronavirus, compared to white people.  

But these same groups have had greater difficulty accessing vaccines – and health care in general – and are more likely to be hesitant about getting vaccinated. 

The Biden administration has said it aims to have a vaccination site within five miles of every person in the U.S., and is slowly opening up more FEMA locations toward that end. 

New FEMA sites will be opened in South Carolina, Colorado and Minnesota, Slavitt announced. 

The quick ramp-up of vaccinations comes at a critical moment, when some experts are warning that the U.S. is on the precipice of a fourth wave of COVID-19 cases. 

Average daily infections have been on the rise for the past four weeks, said CDC director Dr Rochelle Walensky during the Monday briefing.  

With nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population fully vaccinated, ‘we are headed in the right direction,’ said Slavitt. 

Slavitt also revealed that more than 60% of people vaccinated at FEMA sites set up by the federal government are racial or ethnic minorities, for whom vaccination rates have lagged. Picture: A mostly white crowd at Miami's mass vaccination site (file)

Slavitt also revealed that more than 60% of people vaccinated at FEMA sites set up by the federal government are racial or ethnic minorities, for whom vaccination rates have lagged. Picture: A mostly white crowd at Miami's mass vaccination site (file)

Slavitt also revealed that more than 60% of people vaccinated at FEMA sites set up by the federal government are racial or ethnic minorities, for whom vaccination rates have lagged. Picture: A mostly white crowd at Miami’s mass vaccination site (file) 

‘But as you heard the president say, we’re not there yet. The war against COVID-19 is far from over, far from won, and the worst thing we could do right now would be to mistake progress for victory. 

‘If we let our guard down now, we will see more of our fellow Americans get sick and die unnecessarily.’ 

Daily COVID-19 deaths have been declining steadily for the past three months and the average number of fatalities per day is now below 1,000. 

But with emerging hotspots seeing alarming case increases and hospitalizations leveling off, the CDC last week predicted that fatalities will ‘remain stable or have an uncertain trend’ over the course of this month. 

The agency’s latest forecast now predicts that the U.S. death toll will rise as high as 585,000 by April 24. 

Each day that the share of the population vaccinated against COVID-19 rises, the share vulnerable to the infection falls – but even at the quicker pace, the U.S. is still months from being able to drop all other prevention strategies. 

‘Our message remains the same as it’s been all the way through: do your part, wear a mask, socially distance, get vaccinated when it’s your turn, period,’ said Slavitt. 

‘Do all of these things and together we will save lives and we will put this pandemic behind us.’  

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